Bushland

 

EXPLORE THE EXPANSIVE BUSHLAND AT SONGBIRD OXLEY

WHERE YOU’LL BASK IN THE BREEZES, BIRDSONG, AND LEAFY VIEWS

At Songbird Oxley, live a serene lifestyle with the bushland as the backdrop to your own home. With 3.45 hectares of bushland conservation area, you can bask in the breezes, birdsong, and leafy views for hours.

Did you know Songbird Oxley’s conservation area is an environmental corridor that links to Rocks Riverside Park and the Brisbane River? This same woodland was once part of the Gondwana Rainforest: an area of lush rainforest, dense scrub and wetlands that had spiritual significance for Indigenous groups who cared for this site for over 100,000 years.

To acknowledge and pay respects to the traditional custodians of the land on which these stories took place: the Yuggera Ugarapul people and the Turrbal people, over 2.2km of walking trail is proposed with seven informative and interpretive signage points planned for the conservation area.

SEVEN PROPOSED SIGNAGE POINTS FOR THE WALKING TRAIL

  1. Listening and Watching Country: Take the time to sit and listen to the sounds of nature. Allow yourself to be still and watch the native bees, flowering plants, and birds. Take the time to appreciate nature and how it makes you feel.
  2. Plants and People: The Aboriginal people used the bark of trees for shelter, shields, carrying food, baby’s beds and making string. In the landscape are the trees that carry the scars of this ancient use of the bark.
  3. People and Country: Aboriginal people have used several land management approaches to caring for country.  Management methods that are developed over thousands of years of working with country.
  4. Caring for Country: Aboriginal people believed in the principle that if you cared for country, country would provide. Some of the ways Aboriginal people cared for country is through controlled, cool burns. Cool burns were used to protect food forests from natural bush fires, allow access to different areas of the landscape and help build soil health.
  5. Plants and People – Traditional uses of plant material to make baskets or fish traps: The plants in country were used in many ways. The water reeds, bark, grasses, and vines were all used to make string for weaving, tying together canoes, housing, baskets, and mats.
  6. A new Start – Early British Settlement: Many British worked with the Aboriginal people in the early days. Aboriginal people were advisors on the different tree species and were the early labour force for one of the first industries, timber.
  7. A Changing Landscape: The country does not look the same and has been subject to modifications to allow for more people to live here. Some of those changes have re-directed water flow, cleared vegetation, and introduced domesticated animals. Each of these have impacted negatively on our environment and in many cases destroyed unique native food species that once grew here. Together, we can re-imagine country and work towards restoring country for the enjoyment of all.

PROPOSED CONSERVATION AREA WALKING TRAIL

Oxley Concervation Area Walking Trail

PROPOSED TIMEFRAME

The proposed walking trail and seven informative and interpretive signage points planned for the conservation area is planned to be completed by January 2025.